Residents Express Concern Over Possible Environmental Links to Local Cancer Cases

If you attend Collinsville High School you probably know of our three students effected by cancer, but what many people don’t know is the effect cancer has outside our high school throughout our community.

There are over five new cases of cancer within Collinsville alone. Although Collinsville tops the list, the numbers continue to climb as you account for nearby towns such as Owasso and Oologah.

So the question has arose: is there a connection between the numerous new cases of cancer and the location?

“Not only do the three kids go to Collinsville High School, but they even all lived in the same neighborhood at one point,” said Lori Downey, mother of Collinsville senior Tatum Andres who was diagnosed with Lymphoma Non Hodgkins.

Both Oologah and Owasso share at least one water source with Collinsville, but each city has separate retaining systems. Due to certain laws in place contamination cannot supersede a certain level while inside those retaining systems and still be available to the public. In other words once the water leaves the retaining system it’s contamination level is below the mandated level.

Downey took to Facebook to post about how the water might have effected not only Tatum, but others in the area. Her effort did not go unnoticed. Shortly after Downey’s post comments began to pour in:

“…I have seen more new cases of cancer in Collinsville and Owasso than the Tulsa area,” commented a nurse via Facebook.

“If you research back farther (the amount of cancer from this area) gets worse,” comments another one of Downey’s friends.

“This is scary is there a connection?” asked another Facebook user.

The coincidences do not stop there.

“I want you to Google the Tulsa Fuel and Manufacturing Superfund Site in Collinsville,” begged Downey.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, between the years of 1914 to 1925 a 61 acre lot located in Collinsville Oklahoma was a zinc smelter.

cumulis.epa.gov published information saying that the site contaminated soil, sediment, and water with hazardous chemicals. This lot set for 79 years after its closing before the EPA even attempted a clean up project. After examining many reports it is clear that the EPA’s “clean up” consisted of cleaning up hazardous chemicals WITH hazardous levels of cleaning products. It was documented that high acidity level along with a high chlorine count left The City of Collinsville to send out a warning that cancer could be a side effect of this “clean up”, but only to people with low immune systems. It has been speculated that due to the high expense of filtration systems the EPA was left to use alternative methods of decontamination.

After multiple attempts to get in contact with The City of Collinsville someone who asked to remain nameless answered.

“Which one?” she replied when asked about the superfund site. “I don’t think there’s any connection. Look at all the people without cancer in that area,” said the unnamed source.

The facts continue: a confirmed six Collinsville citizens with cancer have been diagnosed with types of Lymphoma. Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that is mostly caused by environmental factors.

Tatum’s Andres family has switched to a new water system and are looking into their legal options regarding the EPA.

“We are not done fighting this,” continued Downey. “We have lawyers and this could end up being a class action lawsuit.”

The EPA, along with Washington Rural Water District #3 declined to comment.

http://wResidents/Utilitiesww.cityofcollinsville.com/

http://www.rwd3washco.com/documents/451/2015_CCR_Report.pdf

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/SiteProfiles/index.cfm?fuseaction=second.scs&id=0604674&doc=Y&colid=32246&requestTimeout=480

https://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0604674

http://time.com/4695109/superfund-sites-toxic-waste-locations/

13 thoughts on “Residents Express Concern Over Possible Environmental Links to Local Cancer Cases

  • May 17, 2017 at 8:09 pm
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    This is a problem that has been decades in the making. It is in the ground water, wells have been shut down, but some will not allow theirs to be tested because they don’t want them shut down. The animals are eating the vegetation and drinking the water. People are eating the animals, fish, and vegetation and drinking the water.It blows in the air, and travels in the water. Do your research. It dates back before most of your grandparents. People ignore these problems until they hit close to home, then they think it is a new discovery. I did a research paper on this 20 years ago for a college science class. It isn’t new.

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  • May 8, 2017 at 8:19 pm
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    *Declined to comment

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  • May 8, 2017 at 7:02 pm
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    I contacted Washington Co rwd #3, my water service, and they said they are not near the super fund site. We are extremely concerned about hazardous drinking water, as anyone would be. In the article you only said that they decided to comment. Are you implying that they are involved?

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  • May 4, 2017 at 8:14 pm
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    My mom was long time resident of Collinsville and my father’s family to,my mom moved to Cleveland in 2005 ,by 2008-09 she was diagnosed with cancer,she passed away 2015 but she grew up next to shemelter hill , off of 12th

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  • May 4, 2017 at 10:28 am
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    “At the Tulsa Fuel and Manufacturing Superfund Site in Collinsville, Oklahoma, blackberry bushes were growing out of smelter waste materials. Area residents were known to pick blackberries for consumption, and local wildlife was observed grazing on the bushes. Samples of roots, leaves and berries from blackberry bushes were evaluated.

    Since samples were collected from different portions of the blackberry bushes, this data set allowed for multiple comparisons, including comparison of source concentrations in soil to different parts of the plant, comparison of washed to unwashed samples (to monitor metals uptake vs. aerial deposition of metals), and comparison of site data to background.”

    http://www.burnsmcd.com/insightsnews/insights/tech-briefs/2016-issue-2/assessing-risk-of-models-versus-measurements

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  • May 4, 2017 at 9:33 am
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    Can you please get in contact with me via Facebook messanger.

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  • May 4, 2017 at 7:23 am
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    I live in my house in Collinsville (rural district 3) . In 2012 I was diagnosed with a rare aggressive leukemia. There are 2 other people who lived in this house before my family who also have gotten cancer. One in 2007 and one in 2011. The superfund people took ground samples all over our property. The results were abnormal and we were put on the list to be cleaned. That has yet to happen.

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  • May 3, 2017 at 10:24 pm
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    This has been a concern of hundreds of us. I first became aware of this in the 1990’s. It has always been brushed aside.

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  • May 3, 2017 at 9:24 pm
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    I graduated in 1986. Several classmates and members if other classes around that time have since died if cancer. How big can this be?

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  • May 3, 2017 at 8:32 pm
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    Did you know, our previous State ATTORNEY general ,Scott Pruitt who is now the EPA secretary(USA), wants to do away with water quality test.
    He will side will the large companies, who have left the toxins on these sites.

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  • May 3, 2017 at 8:08 pm
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    This IS very well-researched. I’m getting my Masters in Public Health and we’ve studied things like this. I’m going to look into this more if I have the time.

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  • May 3, 2017 at 6:10 pm
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    Wow!! This was a very well written article… I am alarmed at this information. Great job!

    Reply

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